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Can Your Diagnosis Make You Angry?

There are several illnesses that would make one flip the script and resort to violent behavior. We know mental health conditions and some diseases go hand and hand. What do you do when a loved one has just got a diagnosis of prostate cancer and the prognosis doesn’t look good?

What approach do you take upon their acting out? We must be able to diffuse this person so that they won’t hurt themselves or someone else. They may be angry due to the doctor’s report they just received. They refuse to accept it and may feel violent to others who enter their space.

Diffusing feelings of anger

First, you may try to communicate verbally and let them know that it’s okay to be angry and understand the anger that they feel. Let them know that they are strong and try to stay positive through this. When you are angry you can’t think straight, and everything feels like the end. Believe it or not, other people can relate to what you are going through.

I would say, let’s find the bright side. We know that things are not always the way we see them. Being violent is not a solution and that it will only make matters worse.

I would like to suggest a strong support system or a good friend to lean on. When you are at your lowest point in life your friends will always be by your side. Don’t leave out your significant other; they can help you see things in a more positive light. You can use this energy for your good. I know you feel anxious, worried, and maybe hopeless. I am emphatic with how you feel, and I will be that listening ear.

Calming an explosive situation

The person who receives bad news might become explosive in using swearing language, becoming loud and rude, and even making physical threats. How do you diffuse this person? You need to empathize, listen, and offer support. Be sure to acknowledge their feelings and repeating back what they are saying to you. You can even nod occasionally to let them know that you get it.

Be on the lookout for extra stress when someone receives bad news. It’s easier to diffuse if you can spot it early. Used common sense, try to resolve the issue. Remain calm and always be polite. Just saying “I’m sorry” can mean a lot. Let them know that you are there for them. Remember that this person has a right to be angry, but you can meet them with kindness.

Ways to cope with anger

  1. Realize that you are angry and cope with it
  2. Don’t take it out on others
  3. Talk to a family member or friend
  4. Find a punching bag or just scream
  5. Listening to music, get a massage, or start a journal
  6. Seek help from a counselor if your anger doesn’t go away

I would suggest that you share with others what you are going through. They might not understand what you are going though, but they can help in other ways. You might just need someone to help with cooking or running errands. You will feel better that someone is offering to help, but the person offering the help will feel better also.

Focus on the good and positive

You are still in control and we all know this is not easy for you. We have all heard that having a positive attitude will make you feel better. Make sure to listen to your doctor and keep your appointments. Set schedules so you know what is going on from day to day. I know this is easier said than done, but don’t worry about what can happen, but focus more on how you can enjoy the rest of your life.

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The ProstateCancer.net team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

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