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Talking to Others About Prostate Cancer

  • By ninaw Keymaster

    Share your tips for talking to people about prostate cancer! How do you tell your story to coworkers, acquaintances, friends and lovers?

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  • By easyethatsme

    I use very open and blunt dialog. If they have any questions, I answer them to the best of my abilities. I don’t get embarrassed easily so I tell them to fire away after I tell a brief story of what happened

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  • By 1717burton

    Has anyone used a rife machine using frequencies for prostate cancer ? My husband has prostate cancer was 10 on Gleason scale and spread to some lymph glands and L4 vertebrae. His PSA was 29.78 Tests done in May 2017. Doctor said cancer in bone and lymph and that cancer would not go away but lupron shot would hold it in place. Had lupron shot in May 2017 and did not have any more shots. Very bad side effects from lupron shots. ((Was not told of all the side effects and how bad side effects could be. Not satisfied hearing The cancer would not go away. Decided to try something else. Decided to try a rife machine. Started using it right after the shot. 4 months later -October 2017- had another scan and lymph glands has resolved themselves and bone showed no new bone cancer and cancer that was in L4 vertebrae had improved. The prostate had shrunk by 40% and PSA was 0.684.

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  • By ninaw Keymaster

    @sabaileytx, I would recommend posting here as well. We’re always here to support as moderators, but it sounds like you could use someone who’s been there. We’ll keep an eye out for those who may have similar experiences. We’re a fairly new site, but hoping we can get you connected. – Nina, ProstateCancer.net Team

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  • By Will Jones Moderator

    I have been very open about my prostate cancer journey, both in conversation and in my articles for PC.net. Even now, 7 months after my surgery, when people ask how I’m doing I let them know I’m cancer free, but still recovering, dealing with the common side effects of surgery. This cancer really offers an opportunity to have meaningful conversations about the realities not just of having prostate cancer, but of the aging process and the changes that accompany it.

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    • By ninaw Keymaster

      Thank you for this perspective, Will! I like the idea of being more open with aging as well – it’s something many are uncomfortable with. Just in having those conversations, you’re working towards greater consciousness of what a prostate cancer diagnosis can mean. Not just a snip and it’s over. Glad you’re here! – Nina, ProstateCancer.net Team

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  • By zippy1954

    I am an RN who works with the homeless population. As part of my duties I present wellness education classes. Even though I am an RN, I have the same concerns or fears as everyone else, with the possible exception that I have some knowledge of health issues, treatments, etc. already so I am not too shocked when I am presented with a diagnosis from a doctor.

    I do not have prostate cancer so I hope I am not out of line posting here. I do have BPH and recently had my first cystoscopy, which I was not looking forward to. When my urologist suggested we do one I did what most guys do. Head for the internet and YouTube. The very first post I read described the procedure as “BARBARIC.” Hmmm, not what I wanted to hear.

    I asked my doctor about what to expect pain wise. He said it was “uncomfortable but not painful.” I asked what we could do to lessen the discomfort and he said he would be injecting lidocaine into my urethra and if I wanted to pay an extra $80.00 I could get nitrous oxide (laughing gas.”) I said “yep, we will be doing that.”

    The day arrived. I took ORC Urostat twice the morning of the procedure to lessen pain when urinating following the procedure. We started the nitrous oxide and I took 10 deep breaths, holding my breath for 5-10 seconds with each breath. After the third inhalation I could feel it kick in. By the tenth one I was awake but didn’t care much bout anything.

    The only discomfort I had was when the lidocaine was put in my urethra, and to be honest it lasted less than half a second and was a 1 out of 10 on the pain scale. I had no other discomfort during the procedure. Following the cystoscopy, he had me roll on my side and he went up my back side to do a prostate ultrasound. Again, zero discomfort. Both procedures were over in less than 20 minutes.

    Thankfully, no bladder cancer or muscularity in the bladder and no evidence of prostate cancer. I am going to be looking at a couple of procedures to deal with the BPH and TURP is not one of them.

    For anyone out there who may be facing a cystoscopy, I encourage you to get the nitrous oxide and do not put off this test or any other for fear of discomfort. It can cost you your life and there are many ways available to block or significantly reduce pain. Ask your doctor about all options available to you.

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    • By ninaw Keymaster

      @zippy1954, we really appreciate you commenting here! This is really valuable advice for men’s health generally, and for prostate cancer screening too. If you hadn’t asked the doctor about options, you would never have known about the laughing gas. I think it can be easy for folks to be intimidated at the doctor and reluctant to ask questions. There are people with negative experiences, but you also never know how something will affect each person. I’m glad you got the test and hopefully have some peace of mind now! If you can, let us know how your BPH treatment goes, we’ve got some folks dealing with that in the community. – Nina, ProstateCancer.net Team

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