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Talking to Others About Prostate Cancer

  • By ninaw Keymaster

    Share your tips for talking to people about prostate cancer! How do you tell your story to coworkers, acquaintances, friends and lovers?

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  • By easyethatsme

    I use very open and blunt dialog. If they have any questions, I answer them to the best of my abilities. I don’t get embarrassed easily so I tell them to fire away after I tell a brief story of what happened

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  • By 1717burton

    Has anyone used a rife machine using frequencies for prostate cancer ? My husband has prostate cancer was 10 on Gleason scale and spread to some lymph glands and L4 vertebrae. His PSA was 29.78 Tests done in May 2017. Doctor said cancer in bone and lymph and that cancer would not go away but lupron shot would hold it in place. Had lupron shot in May 2017 and did not have any more shots. Very bad side effects from lupron shots. ((Was not told of all the side effects and how bad side effects could be. Not satisfied hearing The cancer would not go away. Decided to try something else. Decided to try a rife machine. Started using it right after the shot. 4 months later -October 2017- had another scan and lymph glands has resolved themselves and bone showed no new bone cancer and cancer that was in L4 vertebrae had improved. The prostate had shrunk by 40% and PSA was 0.684.

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  • By ninaw Keymaster

    @sabaileytx, I would recommend posting here as well. We’re always here to support as moderators, but it sounds like you could use someone who’s been there. We’ll keep an eye out for those who may have similar experiences. We’re a fairly new site, but hoping we can get you connected. – Nina, ProstateCancer.net Team

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  • By Will Jones Moderator

    I have been very open about my prostate cancer journey, both in conversation and in my articles for PC.net. Even now, 7 months after my surgery, when people ask how I’m doing I let them know I’m cancer free, but still recovering, dealing with the common side effects of surgery. This cancer really offers an opportunity to have meaningful conversations about the realities not just of having prostate cancer, but of the aging process and the changes that accompany it.

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    • By ninaw Keymaster

      Thank you for this perspective, Will! I like the idea of being more open with aging as well – it’s something many are uncomfortable with. Just in having those conversations, you’re working towards greater consciousness of what a prostate cancer diagnosis can mean. Not just a snip and it’s over. Glad you’re here! – Nina, ProstateCancer.net Team

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