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Metastatic prostate cancer

Looking to connect with men whose cancer has metastasized, specifically in bone lesions. And are on hormone therapy for life. I'm 3 months into lupron/abiraterone(zytiga) and prednisone. Overall health and quality of life. Effectiveness of therapy. Etc.

  1. Hi . While you wait to connect with other men who have metastatic prostate cancer, I thought I would share this collection of articles with you: https://prostatecancer.net/living-stage-iv.


    You said you are three months into hormone therapy - how are you doing so far?


    Also, if you don't mind me asking, have you had any other treatments for prostate cancer before starting Zytiga and Prednisone?


    Talk soon,
    Amylyn (Community manager)

    1. Hi there, I'm one of the moderators and authors on this site. I was diagnosed with stage 4 metastatic PCa in May 2017 with bone mets in pretty much every bone from pelvis to skull. My PSA was 129, Gleason 5+4 and a worst case prognosis of 2 years. The only treatments I've had to date are Prostap, Abiraterone and Prednisolone. My PSA hasn't been recordable for over 3 years and I've just completed a year of running or hiking everyday. If you need any help or guidance please do ask away.

      1. Good to hear Tony - Same Gleason scores here on 2 of my 12 biopsy samples 4+5 and 5+4. My PSA was only 2.8 at the time. Underwent surgery in 2013 - then 5 years later radiation and Lupron So far all remains under control .
        Really encouraging to hear your story Dennis(ProstateCancer.net TEAM)

      2. Prostap, Abiraterone and Prednisone - Wow the combination appears to be keeping things under control for you . Also suspect the drugs in combination with exercise is doing the job . There is apparently a lot of information on the value of exercise in keeping PCa at bay - been doing more and more here as well . Let hope this pattern of success continues ... Dennis(ProstateCancer.net TEAM)

    2. Hi ,


      7 months of Lupron. Sitting tonight with a Lupron hangover which I usually get the day after the shot (which was yesterday). Brain fog, fatigue, etc. This should clear up, it always does, but for me, the first day after my shot is like this. In general I have been feeling good, certainly so much better than the beginning. Was discovered in October 2020, had metastasized to hip bones, groin lymph node. Right leg was suffering some serious edema and I was basically bedridden in November, moved to crutches and cane in December, and was able to walk and drive again by January.


      Still dealing with the idea of this being a forever treatment, and I won't be one of those lucky "finally cancer free" folks. The horse has left the stable as they say, so I am dealing with the idea of Lupron, fatigue and brain fog as part of life now. Hopefully the treatment will contain it for some time, before I need to move on to radiation or other therapy.


      Quality of life was not great last year 😉 but right now is 90% of normal for me. Hoping to maintain that.
      T



      1. Quality of life on lupron is strange - some guys have no reaction to it. A close bud of mine told me other than the occasional minor flush he had no reaction to Lupron. The thoughts of radiation really scared me. I was really quite surprised by the treatment and how quickly and simply it was done . So far it appears to have the PCa under control.
        If it helps at all I did a daily video diary of reactions to EBRT and Lupron that can be found at www.TheProstateCancerCoach.com. The individual segments are short and quick - Feel free to visit ... Dennis(ProstateCancer.net Team)

    3. Hi . I can't personally speak to stage IV PCa, but I want to share with you this article on Xofigo: https://prostatecancer.net/clinical/xofigo-survival-benefits. It mimics the calcium in the bones where the cancer attacks and emits alpha particles that kill the cancer. Because it gets so close to the cancer and only emits the particles a very short distance. peripheral damage is limited. Your doctor should be able to provide additional information, although, as the article discusses, many doctors are not aware of the full range of its benefits, so don't hesitate to ask directly what they know about it. Best, Richard (ProstateCancer.net Team)

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